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Course Offerings

Fall 2017

  • Please Note a Change to AASI 3998-Section 1 to AASI 3221-Section 1 Sociological Perspectives on Asian American Women

AASI 3212 – Section 1 / ENGL 3212 Asian American Literature / Class #6187

MWF 10:10am – 11:00am Austin (CLAS) Building Room 163

This course reviews novels, short stories, drama and poetry by and about Asian Americans. It will discuss significant cultural and historical moments for Asian Americans in different regions of the United States. It will also discuss pre and post 1965 “waves” of Asian immigration and exclusion, and how literature explores the difficulties of dislocation and relocation.

Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3221 – Section 1 Sociological Perspectives on Asian American Women [this course was formerly offered as Variable Topics: Contemporary Indian Society] / Class # 12161

TTH 12:30pm – 1:45pm Storrs Hall Room 002

This course focuses on the social structures affecting the lives of different groups of Asian American women in the United States and relates current experiences of this group to larger socio-historical processes. This course also examines the different social hierarchies – gender, race and class – within which these women, originally from East, South and Southeast Asia, live their lives. The course will look at different institutions, investigate Asian American women’s experiences and explore some organized movements for social change.

Manisha Desai, Professor of Sociology and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3375 – Section 1 / ART 3375 Indian Art & Popular Culture / Class #9956

TUESDAYS 6:30pm – 9:15pm Art Building Room 106

This course will introduce modern and contemporary art from India and the South Asian Diaspora from independence to the present, which will include painting, sculpture, installation and photography, as well as folk and popular art. Lectures on Indian religions and philosophy, and ancient and ritual forms of art will help to contextualize modern and contemporary topics.

Kathryn Myers, Professor of Art & Painting and AAAS Institute Affiliated Faculty

AASI 3578 – Section 1 / HIST 3530 Asian American Experience Since 1850 / Class #7899

TTH 11:00am – 12:15pm Laurel Hall Room 106

The goal of the course is for students to appreciate Asian American history as a social process by learning about the emergence of the social movement, the development of historical inquiry about Asian Americans and the on-going struggle to learn about the past in order to better understand the present. Introducing students to Asian American History as a political social movement, an academic field, and as a cultural practice, this course teaches fundamental historical narratives of Asian Americans in U.S. history, covering the experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian immigrants as well as those of other Pacific Islanders. Instead of learning a strict chronology of events, this course first explores the history of political and academic activism in the formation of Asian American Studies and Ethnic Studies. The majority of the course will be devoted to the diverse histories of migration, integration, and struggle within Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. We will also learn about the culture and politics of the late 20th century through discussions of the “model minority” stereotype, Asian refugees, Asian Americans in popular culture, and their relationship to other racial and ethnic groups.

Jason O. Chang, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3808 – Section 1 / HIST 3808 East Asia to the Mid-19th Century/ Class #6276

TTH 9:30am – 10:45am ITE (Information Technology Engineering Building) Room 119

This course examines the major problems and issues of traditional Chinese and Japanese history and historiography. Special emphasis will be placed on the “Great Tradition” in ideas of both civilizations.

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3812 – Section 1 / HIST 3812 Modern India / Class #6558

TTH 2:00pm – 3:15pm Austin (CLAS Building) Room 103

This course examines the development of India from the Mughal and European invasions of the Sixteenth Century to the present. India’s remarkable synthesis of East and West, traditional and new, is the focus. The course comprises a series of lectures drawn from six main sections: India Today; Traditional India; India in the Muslim Period; The Music and Art of India; India in the European Period; and National and Independent India.

Sharmishtha Roy Chowdhury, Lecturer in History

AASI 3998 – Section 2 Variable Topics: Asian American Experience / Class #6604

TUESDAYS 6:00pm – 9:00pm Student Union Building Room 428
Enrollment is Restricted by Permission of the Instructor Only

Drawing on history, memory and cultural identity, this course begins with cultural critic Lisa Lowe’s assertion that Asian America is marked by heterogeneity, multiplicity and hybridity. Interdisciplinary and pan-ethnic in its approach, the course requires the consent of the Instructor in order to enroll in it.

Angela Rola, Adjunct Instructor and Director, Asian American Cultural Center

AASI 3998 – Section 3 / HIST 3098 Variable Topics: US Asian Relations in the 20th Century / Class #9330 Course Description Forthcoming

MW 2:30pm – 3:45pm LOCATION TO BE DETERMINED
Bradley Simpson, Associate Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3998 – Section 4 / HIST 3810 China and the West to 1949 / Class #9555

TTH 2:00pm – 3:15pm Laurel Hall Room 106

This course analyses China’s political, economic, and cultural encounters with the Western Powers from the seventeenth century to 1949. Students will consider the changing structure of Chinese society in order to understand how Imperial China perceived the West. Additionally, this course addresses different strategies employed by the Western Powers to gain influence in China, ranging from missionary work and the opium trade to military invasion. In the twentieth century, Chinese people borrowed such foreign concepts as republican government, revolution, and nationalism to overthrow the Qing dynasty and to launch political, economic, and social reforms that were unprecedented in scale and human cost. This course aims to help students reflect on the perceived and real impact of Chinese and Western civilizations on each other.

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 4999 Independent Study / Requires Independent Study Authorization Form

Section (001) / Class #6789 – Class Time and Location TBA / Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies

Section (002) / Class #7893 – Class Time and Location TBA / Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies

Spring 2017

*Please Note the NEW COURSES offered under AASI 3998 VARIABLE TOPICS

AASI 3201 Introduction to Asian American Studies / CLASS # 19608
TTH 11:00AM – 12:15PM STORRS CAMPUS Student Union Building Room 428 / NEW LOCATION

A multidisciplinary introduction to major themes in Asian American Studies, this course will cover concepts of identity and community, migration and labor histories, Asians and the law, representations of Asians in visual and popular culture, gender issues, interracial and interethnic relations, and human rights.

Cathy Schlund-Vials, Professor of English and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED  / AASI 3222 Asian Indian Women: Activism and Social Change in India and the United States / CLASS # 17510 

A survey of how gender, class and ethnicity/race structure everyday lives of Asian Indian women in both India and the United States. India and Indian women are often in the news. This course will help to understand Asian Indian women’s activism from a socio-historical perspective, beginning with an overview of women’s activism in the 19th and 20th centuries when the Indian subcontinent was under British colonial rule to more recent cases of activism in independent India, including activism against violence, which is often missing from news reports. A survey of how gender, class and ethnicity/race structure everyday lives of Asian Indian women in both India and the United States, this course comprehensively and with depth help students analyze why, how, and when women have challenged global and local conditions to expand their claims to economic, social, cultural, political and civil human rights. This class meets with the requirements for SOCI 3222 and HRTS 3573.

Koyel Khan, Adjunct Instructor, Department of Sociology, UConn

AASI 3473 Asian Pacific American Families / CLASS # 24344
TUTH 11:00AM – 12:15PM STAMFORD CAMPUS LOCATION TBA

This course is an overview of the social, cultural, educational, demographic and economic characteristics of Asian-Pacific American families. Students will examine and critique the values, customs, traditions and beliefs that distinguish families of this heterogeneous ethnic population.

Michael Ego, Professor of Human Development and Family Studies and Courtesy Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3531 Japanese Americans and WWII / CLASS # 14247
TUTH 2:00pm – 3:15pm STORRS CAMPUS Student Union Building Room 428

Japanese Americans and World War II examines the events that led to martial law in Hawaii after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and the forced removal and confinement of over 100,000 Americans and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry on the U.S. mainland after Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This course illuminates the wartime experiences of Japanese Americans and assesses some of the consequences of those events for all Americans. This class meets with the requirements of HIST3531.

Roger N. Buckley, Emeritus Professor of History and Adjunct/Courtesy Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3531 Japanese Americans and WWII / CLASS # 24654
W 3:35pm – 6:05pm WATERBURY CAMPUS ROOM 203

Japanese Americans and World War II examines the events that led to martial law in Hawaii after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and the forced removal and confinement of over 100,000 Americans and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry on the U.S. mainland after Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This course illuminates the wartime experiences of Japanese Americans and assesses some of the consequences of those events for all Americans. This class meets with the requirements of HIST3531.

Christine Reardon, Lecturer in History, Affiliated Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3578  Asian American Experience Since 1850 / CLASS # 20294
TUTH 12:30PM – 1:45PM STORRS CAMPUS LOCATION TBA

The goal of the course is for students to appreciate Asian American history as a social process by learning about the emergence of the social movement, the development of historical inquiry about Asian Americans and the on-going struggle to learn about the past in order to better understand the present. Introducing students to Asian American History as a political social movement, an academic field, and as a cultural practice, this course teaches fundamental historical narratives of Asian Americans in U.S. history, covering the experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian immigrants as well as those of other Pacific Islanders. Instead of learning a strict chronology of events, this course first explores the history of political and academic activism in the formation of Asian American Studies and Ethnic Studies. The majority of the course will be devoted to the diverse histories of migration, integration, and struggle within Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. We will also learn about the culture and politics of the late 20th century through discussions of the “model minority” stereotype, Asian refugees, Asian Americans in popular culture, and their relationship to other racial and ethnic groups.

Jason O. Chang, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3809  East Asia Since the Mid-19th Century / CLASS # 22314
TUTH 3:30PM – 4:45PM STORRS CAMPUS LOCATION TBA

This course examines the reactions of East Asia to the Western threat, and the rise of Asian nationalism, communism, and fascism. Special attention to the tensions caused by the conflict of ideas. Prerequisite: Open to Juniors and Seniors

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

NEW COURSE / AASI 3998 (Section 001) Variable Topics: Elementary Hindi / CLASS # 22192
TUTH 11:00AM – 12:15PM and FRI 11:15AM – 12:05PM STORRS CAMPUS LOCATION TBA

Development of ability to communicate in Hindi, orally and in writing, to satisfy basic survival needs within a cultural setting.

NEW INSTRUCTOR / Saroj Kashwan, Adjunct Instructor, Department of Literature, Culture & Languages, UConn

NEW COURSE / AASI 3998 (Section 002) Variable Topics: Gender and Human Rights / CLASS # 24856
TH 3:30PM – 6:30PM STORRS CAMPUS MANCHESTER HALL ROOM 328

Gender and Human Rights Grad Seminar. May be open to advanced undergraduate students with consent of Instructor. This course also meets with SOCI 5895-001.

Manisha Desai, Professor of Sociology and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

NEW COURSE / AASI 3998 (Section 003) Variable Topics: Foreign Relations of China since 1949 / CLASS # 25018
TUTH 11:00AM – 12:15PM STORRS CAMPUS LOCATION TBA

Please contact Prof. Zatsepine for more information. Open to Juniors and Seniors. This course also meets with HIST 3095-002.

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 4999 Independent Study / Requires Authorization Form
Section (003) – Class # 14955
Cathy Schlund-Vials, Professor of English and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

Fall 2016

*Please Welcome our NEW FACULTY / Alexus McLeod, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3212 / ENGL 3212 Asian American Literature / Class #6509

TTH 9:30am – 10:45am Austin (CLAS) Building Room 163

This course reviews novels, short stories, drama and poetry by and about Asian Americans. It will discuss significant cultural and historical moments for Asian Americans in different regions of the United States. It will also discuss pre and post 1965 “waves” of Asian immigration and exclusion, and how literature explores the difficulties of dislocation and relocation.

Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3220 / ARTH 3020 Asian American Art and Visual Culture / Class #11350 / FLYER

MW 10:30am – 11:45am Art Building Room 106

This interdisciplinary course explores issues of contemporary Asian American identity in art and visual culture, with an emphasis on the need for greater transcultural awareness and understanding in the fluid environment of the post-Cold War world where people, ideas and images swiftly traverse ever more porous national boundaries.

Margo L. Machida, Professor of Art & Art History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3221 / SOCI 3221 Sociological Perspectives on Asian American Women

Also offered as HRTS 3571 / MWF 11:15am – 12:05pm Family Studies Building Room 102

This course provides an overview of social structures, inter-group relations, and women’s rights, focusing on the experience of Asian American women.

NEW INSTRUCTORManisha Desai, Professor of Sociology and AAAS Institute Affiliated Faculty

AASI 3375 / ART 3375 Indian Art & Popular Culture / Class #11190

Tuesdays 6:30pm – 9:15pm Art Building Room 106

This course will introduce modern and contemporary art from India and the South Asian Diaspora from independence to the present, which will include painting, sculpture, installation and photography, as well as folk and popular art. Lectures on Indian religions and philosophy, and ancient and ritual forms of art will help to contextualize modern and contemporary topics.

Kathryn Myers, Professor of Art & Painting and AAAS Institute Affiliated Faculty

AASI 3578 / HIST 3530 Asian American Experience Since 1850 / Class #8389

TTH 9:30am – 10:45am Laurel Hall Room 107

The goal of the course is for students to appreciate Asian American history as a social process by learning about the emergence of the social movement, the development of historical inquiry about Asian Americans and the on-going struggle to learn about the past in order to better understand the present. Introducing students to Asian American History as a political social movement, an academic field, and as a cultural practice, this course teaches fundamental historical narratives of Asian Americans in U.S. history, covering the experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian immigrants as well as those of other Pacific Islanders. Instead of learning a strict chronology of events, this course first explores the history of political and academic activism in the formation of Asian American Studies and Ethnic Studies. The majority of the course will be devoted to the diverse histories of migration, integration, and struggle within Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. We will also learn about the culture and politics of the late 20th century through discussions of the “model minority” stereotype, Asian refugees, Asian Americans in popular culture, and their relationship to other racial and ethnic groups.

Jason O. Chang, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3808 / HIST 3808 East Asia to the Mid-19th Century/ Class #6605

TTH 11:00am – 12:15pm Laurel Hall Room 106

This course examines the major problems and issues of traditional Chinese and Japanese history and historiography. Special emphasis will be placed on the “Great Tradition” in ideas of both civilizations.

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3812 / HIST 3812 Modern India / Class #6911

TTH 2:00pm – 3:15pm Student Union Building Room 428

This course examines the development of India from the Mughal and European invasions of the Sixteenth Century to the present. India’s remarkable synthesis of East and West, traditional and new, is the focus. The course comprises a series of lectures drawn from six main sections: India Today; Traditional India; India in the Muslim Period; The Music and Art of India; India in the European Period; and National and Independent India.

NEW INSTRUCTOR / Sharmishtha Roy Chowdhury, Lecturer in History

CANCELLED / AASI 3998 (Section 001) Variable Topics: Contemporary Indian Society / Class # 11352

TTH 12:00pm – 1:15pm Monteith Room 112

In this introduction to contemporary Indian society, we will examine what makes the world’s largest democracy tick. We will begin with a brief overview of its diverse histories – including colonial rule and struggle for independence — and then focus on contemporary social, political, and cultural challenges. In particular, we will examine how its economic liberalization policies have impacted diverse sections of Indian society, paying particular attention to caste, class, and gender; contemporary cultural expressions (e.g., films, art, sport) and contestations; and the various struggles for social justice.

Manisha Desai, Professor of Sociology and AAAS Institute Affiliated Faculty

AASI 3998 (Section 002) Variable Topics: Asian American Experience / Class #6961

T 6:00pm – 9:00pm Student Union Building Room 428
Enrollment is Restricted by Permission of the Instructor Only

Drawing on history, memory and cultural identity, this course begins with cultural critic Lisa Lowe’s assertion that Asian America is marked by heterogeneity, multiplicity and  hybridity. Interdisciplinary and pan-ethnic in its approach, the course requires the consent of the Instructor in order to enroll in it.

Angela Rola, Adjunct Instructor and Director, Asian American Cultural Center

NEW COURSE / AASI 3998 (Section 003) / HIST 3098 Variable Topics: US Asian Relations in the 20th Century / Class #10257

W 4:40pm – 7:10pm Koons Hall Room 201
Course Description Forthcoming

Bradley Simpson, Associate Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

HIST 3101W Variable Topics: History through Fiction – The Viet Nam War

TTH 2:00pm – 3:15pm Austin/CLAS Building Room 445

The “Fall of Saigon” signaled the end of U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia and the conclusion of the Vietnam War. Through a variety of novels, short stories, and other fictional accounts, with particular emphasis on works by Vietnamese writers and American authors, we will contemplate the Vietnam War. Students will explore how writers have used literature to advocate specific political perspectives, to question conventional depictions of the conflict, and to capture the plight of ordinary people in wartime. Readings include Vietnamerica, The Sorrow of War, The Things They Carried, Miss Saigon, and Mourning Headband for Huế. This course will be team taught.

Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

Nu-Anh Tran, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 3998 (Section 005) / HIST 3810 China and the West to 1949 / Class #10623

TTH 3:30pm – 4:45pm Laurel Hall Room 107

This course analyses China’s political, economic, and cultural encounters with the Western Powers from the seventeenth century to 1949. Students will consider the changing structure of Chinese society in order to understand how Imperial China perceived the West. Additionally, this course addresses different strategies employed by the Western Powers to gain influence in China, ranging from missionary work and the opium trade to military invasion. In the twentieth century, Chinese people borrowed such foreign concepts as republican government, revolution, and nationalism to overthrow the Qing dynasty and to launch political, economic, and social reforms that were unprecedented in scale and human cost. This course aims to help students reflect on the perceived and real impact of Chinese and Western civilizations on each other.

Victor Zatsepine, Assistant Professor of History and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

NEW COURSE / AASI 3998 (Section 006) / PHIL 3264 Variable Topics: Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture / Class #11353

MWF 1:25pm – 2:15pm Information Technology Engineering Building Room 127

In this course we will look at the formative philosophical thought of the early Chinese tradition, primarily in the Warring States Period and the Western Han Dynasty.  We will look at multiple schools and texts, including Confucian, Daoist, Mohist, Legalist, and Syncretist texts.  Topics covered will include virtue, human nature, proper governance, thriving, knowledge, the “Way” (dao), and the nature of truth.  We will also study the historical context in which these theories developed, looking at important events and figures in the period, including Qin Shi Huang and the unification of the Warring States in 221 BCE, the dispute surrounding the Huainanzi between Emperor Wu of Han and Liu An in the mid 2nd century BCE, and the rise of Wang Mang in the opening years of the 1st century CE.

We will read selections from a wide range of primary texts, including: Lunyu (The Analects of Confucius), Xunzi, Mozi, Zhuangzi, Hanfeizi, Jia Yi’s Xinshu, Huainanzi, Sima Qian’s Shiji, and Ban Gu’s Han Shu.

NEW FACULTY / Alexus McLeod, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Core Faculty, AAAS Institute

AASI 4999 Independent Study / Requires Independent Study Authorization Form

Section (001) / Class #7154 – Class Time and Location TBA / Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies

Section (002) / Class #8383 – Class Time and Location TBA / Cathy Schlund-Vials, Associate Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies

Section (003) / Class 10846 – Class Time and Location TBA / Roger N. Buckley, Professor of History and AAAS Institute Courtesy Faculty

Section (004) / Class 10858 – Class Time and Location TBA / Roger N. Buckley, Professor of History and AAAS Institute Courtesy Faculty