University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Michael M. Ego

Michael EgoProfessor of Human Development & Family Studies and Asian American Studies

UConn-Stamford 361
Phone: (203) 251 – 8531
Email: michael.ego@uconn.edu

NEW & NEWSWORTHY

Michael M. Ego has been tapped to present in the 2015 Center for Elder Abuse Prevention (CAPE) Symposium that will take place on April 22 at the University of Connecticut’s Stamford Campus, Gen Re Auditorium. He will deliver “Racial Culture: Older Immigrants and Asian/Pacific Americans” in which he will also address their risks, whether abuse or neglect, and their needs for assistance and services, as well as identify the health and social welfare policies needed to improve their well-being and quality of life. This presentation follows closely with the release of the first Asian Pacific American Community Needs Assessment in the State of Connecticut that was developed, conducted, and analyzed by Dr. Ego, and AAAS Institute Affiliate Faculty members Thomas Buckley (Associate Prof. of Clinical Pharmacy) and Megan Berthold (Assistant Prof. of Social Work).

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies Michael Ego has served as Associate Vice Provost at the University of Connecticut, Stamford Campus, and Professor of HDFS & Asian and Asian American Studies, since January 2005. Prior to joining UConn, he served as Dean of the College of Applied Sciences and Arts at San Jose State University (California).

He has also held academic appointments at San Jose State University, University of Hawaii at Hilo, University of Oregon, Miami University (Ohio), and California State University at Northridge. He earned his Ph.D. in Leisure Studies and Services/Gerontology from the University of Oregon, and conducted Post-Doctoral research at Miami University in Social Gerontology/Minority Aging.

His research interests include: Asian Pacific American families; Ethnicity, Asian Pacific Americans, and Japanese Americans and Aging; Retirement Adaptation; Leisure Preference Patterns of Pre-Retiree Populations; and Cross-Cultural Aging.